A careful reading of this sentence shows that “an engineering student” is unique; Therefore, the pronoun they should be replaced by him or her in the following sentence. To identify the pronoun-precursor agreement, we should first define what a pronoun is. Simply put, pronouns are words that replace nouns. Instead of using the same names over and over again (which can be complicated), pronouns allow for more interesting and concise paper, as long as pronouns and precursors match in person, number, and gender. 1. If the different parts of the compound subject are connected by and by the interconnected, always use plural text. According to the APA Style Blog, “if transgender and gender non-conforming people (including Agender, Genderqueer and other communities) use the singular as pronouns, authors should also use the singular `them` when writing about them” (para. 1). There will be times when, and not, we will use to join a compound precursor; rather, again or will be used. If this happens, the pronoun must correspond in number to the next precursor. For example, neither Joseph nor his brothers received their application on time. Since the brothers are a plural noun and the precursor is closest to the nor pronoun, the pronoun that meets their needs must also be plural. If the assembled precursors were reversed in this sentence, the sentence would be (correctly) constructed: neither Joseph`s brothers nor Joseph received his candidacy in time.




Joseph (a singular noun) is the closest precursor to the nor pronoun, which is why the pronoun that follows (his own) must also be singular. For more information on the correct use of “ni/ni”, see the Grammar Girl Podcast (link below). Over-conforming pronouns is a common problem for those who want to speak and write correctly. Many languages treat pronouns differently from English, especially those of grammatical sex. Fortunately, you can solve these challenges with some information and tips. 5. Don`t be misled by a sentence that is between the subject and the verb. The verb is in agreement with the subject, not with a noun or pronoun in the phrasing. 11. Expressions as with, with, including, accompanied by, in addition or not to change the subject number. . .

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